Vienna Love

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Vogelsangberg (516m), one of my favorite hills in Vienna

First of all, I’m sorry you have to read another english post. My recent posting about relocation has been somewhat sober, according to a great friend. At current times I have troubles to be emotional in my native language. To be honest: I missed Vienna just a couple of months after moving to Salzburg two years ago. Each trip to Vienna since then felt like holiday, like balm for the soul, with great encounters and profound conversations. Back in Salzburg I was constantly annoyed about the sparse bus intervals at main station, prolonged waiting with egoistic smokers prompting me to change position every minute. The bus was often crowded and I always had to go a few more minutes by foot, along too narrow pavements being slippery during winter as winter services usually clear the main roads but not the side roads (Overall there are only 40 men in the winter services responsible for entire Salzburg!). 30 minutes by bus, 10 minutes taking the taxi. So in the end I didn’t like to come back, neither from Vienna trips nor from any hiking tours. It was always a pain in the ass.

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Greta Thunberg: Passionate autistic

Slightly above-average SST may have contributed to the excess of fresh snow in the first January weeks in wide parts of the northern alpine region (Source: hhttps://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/, more detailed analysis (in german)

Originally I wanted to write about something else but it can wait. I just can’t stand it to see a big shitstorm coming over young autistic climate activist Greta Thunberg expressing herself in a blunt but passionate way about the closing window to prevent a climate catastrophy on our planet. To be honest I didn’t listen to the latest news about the young activism movement for a while, mainly for one reason …

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Invisible for you (translation)

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I translated my german entry Was ihr nicht seht (II) in english. Some phrases may sound a bit different with respect to the origin since I generally prefer to express my thoughts and feelings in english.

How to explain autism/Asperger’s in a way to be understood? Depending on attention span and given time window of my dialogue partner, I miss often the really important parts of my explanation. It’s always a feeling of high pressure because it’s a a thin line between mistaken for a savant and being underrated in what I’m able to do. Here in Austria, most people never heared of Asperger himself, so if I say autism, people automatically think of autism in terms of Leo Kanner (infantile autism) who defined much more narrow symptomes than Hans Asperger. I also have to stress out that autism is not a fashion label and despite we may share some of these symptomes, not all people including you will automatically be autistic.
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